Lee Giles: Are Designers Defined by Their Sketching and Drawing Skills? (5/5)

After reading four different texts about the way that we see things in relation to design and drawing, I have discovered a multitude of differences between the ways in which we, as designers can communicate our ideas. I used the examples in most of my previous blog posts and tried to replicate them in practice.

Pink’s, ‘A Whole New Mind’, was the text that gave me the lightbulb moment. I started to think about the sketch quality and its relation to what we were seeing. You may be looking straight at what you are sketching/photographing/painting, but you are not seeing. He encourages you to look closer and look at the relationships between the lines and shapes rather than just what is in front of you. The end message though leads me to think that Pink believes the better quality the sketch/drawing the better you are at looking at things. I don’t know if I can fully agree with him. As a designer quality of sketching does not necessarily mean you are not looking. Sometimes you just need to jot down your ideas quickly and they don’t always come out as a masterpiece.

 

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First attempt at drawing my hand.

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Second attempt at drawing and seeing the shapes and lines.

In contrast to Daniel Pink thinking that your improved sketching means improved seeing, Rhode believes that sketching should be harmless, not judgemental and fun. He says that sketches are for expressing ideas and that you shouldn’t worry about how they look as long as you get your message across. It’s good to practice sketchnoting so that you can quickly and easily jot down your ideas, however it doesn’t matter as long as your ideas are noted. After trying this technique I think that its a valuable way of expressing ideas quickly and creating a ‘visual map’ of your thoughts. As a designer this is extremely valuable.

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I tried to make reading John Berger’s book a bit more fun by practicing sketchnoting.

I strongly agree with Roam’s theory that by using the ‘6 Ways of Seeing’ you can problem solve your way to achievement. He believes that by Seeing instead of Looking you can find the cause of the problem much easier. But only through visual thinking. By collecting and gathering your thoughts with your own sketches and planning out what is actually going on. It gives you a wider perspective of the situation at hand. This is very much applicable to designing and sketching. You need to be able to manage your thoughts and clearly show your ideas on paper. I practiced this at my work to help my boss create an ordering process for her Jewellery shop.

Berger’s ‘Ways of Seeing’ was probably one of the texts that I read, which I disagreed with the most. He believes that for an artist to portray an idea you have to be a master of that craft. I believe that we can communicate the same ideas from a 5 minute sketch that are often portrayed in the great masters work. I have appreciation for art pieces of that nature however in regards to conveying ideas, I do believe it can be done much quicker.

After researching for the question, ‘Should Designers be Defined by Their Drawing Skills?’ I have come to learn a lot more than just about drawing. I have learned about how we see and how to resolve problems. Before I was positive that it shouldn’t matter if an artist can sketch. Does it matter in the design process? I have changed my mind slightly now though. It’s highly beneficial to note down in sketches. Your ideas become clearer. However they don’t have to be masterpieces. They don’t have to be oil paintings and they don’t have to be finely drawn pencil sketches. As long as your ideas are understandable. Designers shouldn’t be defined by their sketching skills, however they should be defined by their ability to convey their ideas through sketching.

John Berger: Are Designers Defined by Their Drawing and Sketching Skills? (1/5)

Daniel Pink: Are Designers Defined by Their Drawing and Sketching Skills? (2/5)

Dan Roam: Are Designers Defined by Their Drawing and Sketching Skills? (3/5)

Mike Rhode: Are Designers Defined by Their Drawing and Sketching Skills? (4/5)

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4 thoughts on “Lee Giles: Are Designers Defined by Their Sketching and Drawing Skills? (5/5)

  1. Pingback: Dan Roam: Are Designers Defined by Their Drawing and Sketching Skills? (3/5) – gilesart

  2. Pingback: Mike Rhode: Are Designers Defined by Their Drawing and Sketching Skills? (4/5) – gilesart

  3. Pingback: Daniel Pink: Are Designers Defined by Their Drawing and Sketching Skills? (2/5) – gilesart

  4. Pingback: John Berger: Are Designers Defined by Their Drawing and Sketching Skills? (1/5) – gilesart

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